Storage Solutions

Here we’ve gathered some ideas and examples of real-life storage solutions in various artist’s studios.

Jump to:

Large canvas storage solution
Shelf for works in progress
Storing framed work
Storing works on paper without flat files
Inventory labels and photographing work
Documenting work before storage

 



Slideshow: Large canvas storage solution in studio of Mario Martinez

Rolling a canvas around a rigid tube lined with plastic can protect and stabilize a canvas without a space-consuming stretcher. Foam blocks further protect by cushioning the canvas where the weight is resting.



Photo: Shelf for works in progress in the studio of Gladys Triana

Dedicating a shelf and boxes for works-in-progress is another strategy for maintaining an organized work space.



Slideshow: Storing framed work without crates in the studio of Otto Neals

Shelving small and medium sized framed work between pieces of cardboard can be a practical solution to handling large quantities of framed works.



Slideshow: Storing works on paper without flat files in the studio of Kazuko Miyamoto

Tubes can be an alternative to a flatfile for storing oversized works on paper such as sketches, posters and prints. Using archival boxes with labels organizes and protects flat and 2-dimensional works in progress.



Slideshow: Inventory labels and photographing work in the studio of Jaime Davidovich

Identify a section in your space for photo documentation. Attach an inventory label to storage cases such as archival boxes, flatfiles and portfolios.



Slideshow: Documenting work before storage in the studio of Arlan Huang

Documenting large-scale work with an iPhone before wrapping and storing can be a great tool to include in your condition reports.